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veganmoonprincess:

wickedclothes:

Home Planetarium

The waterproof planetarium floats in water and contains a bright light that projects out into the room, or even into the tub itself when flipped over. This is the latest in home lifestyle goods from Japan in Sega’s famous “toys for adults” series for creating relaxing atmospheres using ambient lighting. Sold at Japan Trend Shop.

yeah but I need this

(Source: wickedclothes, via fuckyeahpikacha)


Director Christopher Nolan’s own personal hand drawn graph detailing the path taken by the team through out Inception.

Director Christopher Nolan’s own personal hand drawn graph detailing the path taken by the team through out Inception.

(via pondsie)

dbvictoria:

Add for German home improvement company shows dad doing something special for his goth daughter.

(x)

(via creepyspacefox)

rudygodinez:

Alexey Titarenko, City of Shadows, (1992-1994)

Inspiration lies everywhere. In fact, it can even be found in the darkest of times. For Alexey Titarenko, that time came when the Soviet Union collapsed. “In the winter of 1991-1992, one cold and gloomy day, I strolled sadly down a street which used to be packed with people, which used to be full of joyful vibrancy and dynamism,” shares Titarenko. “I saw people on the verge of insanity, in confusion: They looked like shadows, undernourished and worn out.” 

While waiting outside a subway station, Titarenko noticed how a crowd of people evolved in front of his very eyes. With the belief that he could make time stand still by changing the camera’s shutter speed, he created this interesting set of photos. He called the series City of Shadows.

 

(via pondsie)

The photography of William Eggleston

A native Southerner raised on a cotton plantation in the Mississippi Delta, Eggleston has created a singular portrait of his native South since the late 1960s. After discovering photography in the early 1960s, he abandoned a traditional education and instead learned from photographically illustrated books by Walker Evans, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Robert Frank. Although he began his career making black-and-white images, he soon abandoned them to experiment with color technology to record experiences in more sensual and accurate terms at a time when color photography was largely confined to commercial advertising. In 1976 with the support of John Szarkowski, the influential photography historian, critic, and curator, Eggleston mounted “Color Photographs” a now famous exhibition of his work at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. William Eggleston’s Guide , in which Szarkowski called Eggleston’s photographs “perfect,” accompanied this groundbreaking one-person show that established his reputation as a pioneer of color photography. His subjects were mundane, everyday, often trivial, so that the real subject was seen to be color itself. These images helped establish Eggleston as one of the first non-commercial photographers working in color and inspired a new generation of photographers, as well as filmmakers. 

Eggleston has published his work extensively. He continues to live and work in Memphis, and travels considerably for photographic projects. (x)

(Source: vintagegal, via bettybonesco)